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We get excited about what we do - talking to teachers, and authors, chatting with pupils and turning conversations and ideas into practical educational series. Find out more about our guest bloggers.

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SATs results day - Mathematics 2019

The 2019 Key Stage 2 SATs results have been published. For mathematics, the percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard is the highest yet at 79%. This is up by 4 percentage points from 2018, but an increase of 5 percentage points from 2016.

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SATs Reasoning Blog 1: Tackling Selected Response Questions

In this first blog article, out of a series of two, Sarah-Anne Fernandes discusses the 'selected response' type questions that pupils will face in their maths reasoning paper.

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Should maths be real life?

In this blog article, Nick Hart discusses the effectiveness of using real-life problems in maths.

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Out of the hat! Magic with maths

In this blog article, John Dabell demonstrates how maths can be combined with magic tricks to bring numbers to life.

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Modelling and explaining a mathematical concept

In this blog article, Nick Hart proposes 5 phases of teacher modelling to set children up to succeed.

 

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Why you should forget ability groups in maths

In this blog article, John Dabell discusses why between-class ability grouping in maths should be abandoned.  

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Maths Misconceptions: mistakes, misunderstanding and muddles

This post from teacher and inspector, John Dabell, addresses key misconceptions in maths and suggests an effective activity to overcome them.

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Teaching quarters in Mathematics

Many thanks to Nick Hart for this blog post, which looks at teaching quarters in mathematics.

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How to use the bar model to help all children to problem solve

When learning how to write and interpret stories, knowledge of story structure is key. If a reader or writer has a deep knowledge of these basic plots, they’ll be much better equipped to understand and construct their own. One cannot write a great mystery story without a sound knowledge of the structure of a mystery story!

Parallels can be drawn to the subject of maths where there are several basic underlying structures that are based on the idea of the relationship between a whole and its parts. Two or more parts, when combined, make a whole. Basic structures begin with additive reasoning and then progress through to multiplicative reasoning. Once you know the structure, you can solve the problem! Read more »

Success Criteria in Mathematics

Many thanks to Nick Hart for this blog post, which takes a look at success criteria in mathematics.

 

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