Insight into the new Computing Curriculum - Part 2

This post looks at the new Computing Curriculum at Key stage 2.

Pupils should be taught to:

  • design, write and debug programs that accomplish specific goals, including controlling or simulating physical systems; solve problems by decomposing them into smaller parts

  • use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output

  • use logical reasoning to explain how some simple algorithms work and to detect and correct errors in algorithms and programs

  • understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration

  • use search technologies effectively, appreciate how results are selected and ranked, and be discerning in evaluating digital content

  • select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information

  • use technology safely, respectfully and responsibly; recognise acceptable/unacceptable behaviour; identify a range of ways to report concerns about content and contact.


Once again Scratch meets the need for the first three parts of this curriculum, pupils can start with scripted animation, starting with Cartoons and then moving onto creating games.  Pupils can also look at games that meet needs of the curriculum, e.g. drill and practice questions for x tables quiz for example. By doing this, they are able to add in repetition and randomisation, they are able to introduce variables.  Older children can then create these for other children in school.

This video from BBC Cracking the Code shows game programming within a primary school:


Other examples for using this, could be can the children re create angry birds in scratch or a zombie invasion game? Other cross curricular uses for Scratch include:

Islamic art, animating traditional tales, MFL - program in Spanish, food chains and jigsaw puzzles.

understand computer networks, including the internet; how they can provide multiple services, such as the World Wide Web, and the opportunities they offer for communication and collaboration - for this sites such as 100 WC and Quadblogging - enable children to have this opportunity to do both. As well as running class or school blogs and using Wikis within subjects.  Another great activity for this is asking the children if they can draw the internet? This could be done every year and would also make a great display in a computing suite or classroom.  This site Can you draw the Internet has some great ideas and videos that you can also explore within the class. It is also possible to view the code that makes up pages on the web - to do this go to view and click source or page source depending on the browser that you are using. When blogging by switching from visual to HTML view also enables children to understand how web pages are put together. This video also describes the differences between the web and the internet:


select, use and combine a variety of software (including internet services) on a range of digital devices to design and create a range of programs, systems and content that accomplish given goals, including collecting, analysing, evaluating and presenting data and information Mozilla have a huge range of resources that can be used Thimble enables children to create their own web pages, enabling them to see the code as well as what the page will look like side by side.  By following here you can start remixing projects including postcards and an ingredient for me as well as a learning map - all great ideas! X ray goggles also from Mozilla enables you to remix web pages you can find out more here, children can then insert their names into BBC websites for example to showcase their football team. www.w3schools.com is a great site for teaching yourself code or letting more able students explore to look at, this covers a range of coding languages. Google apps for Education as well as Office 365 for education both provide opportunities for meeting this strand.

Search engines This video explains how search engines work


An interesting discussion can be around how does Google choose? Is it adverts? Based on relevance - look at how many other pages link to that page. Looking at pictures from Google of where data is stored.

Throughout all of this should run the theme of E safety, a strand that is becoming increasingly more important as technology develops - Northern Grid have a fantastic site that is full of excellent resources for staying safe online.

 

Tags

coding, internet, Switched On Computing

x
Added to your basket:
Checkout