Insight into the new Computing curriculum - Part 1

In September, Lambeth CLC hosted a twilight session sponsored by Rising stars.  It was led by Miles Berry and gave an insight into the new computing curriculum.  It was a packed two hours and gave the attendees a lot to think about and loads of ideas to take away.

We started off by thinking what a curriculum is for?  Core elements from the attendees came up with preparation, one system for all, development in key areas. The National curriculum is the statutory required of schools. We were shown a fantastic quote:
"If you want a golden rule that will fit with everybody, this is it: Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful" William Morris 1880

Shouldn't the same apply to our curriculum? Interestingly int he 2009 review of ICT capability by Jim rose there was no mention of creativity!

Teaching for Learning in needs to move from the left hand side of characteristics below to the right hand side:

Users                                                                     Makers

Consumers                                                           Creators

Communicators                                                  Collaborators

Digitally literate                                                  Digitally critical

Safe                                                                          Responsible

Skills                                                                      Understanding

So that the move and the change would look something similar to this:



 

The Royal Society recommended the 3 domains Computer Science, Information technology and Digital Literacy - Miles suggested that it was worth looking at theses as Foundations, Applications and Implications - a really positive  way of looking at the curriculum.

Moving on to the new Computing curriculum.


At Key stage 1

Pupils should be taught to:

  •  understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions

  • create and debug simple programs

  • use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs

  • use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content

  • recognise common uses of information technology beyond school

  •  use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies.


We then looked at these in turn with examples of what could be used:

use technology purposefully to create, organise, store, manipulate and retrieve digital content - for this if you look at the wide range of resources that you already use in schools then this part of the curriculum is met - for example the range of tools available from 2Simple and available on purple mash 

recognise common uses of information technology beyond school, use technology safely and respectfully, keeping personal information private; identify where to go for help and support when they have concerns about content or contact on the internet or other online technologies - Switched on ICT scheme does this with the matching grid showing how this links into real world contexts, also how the Switched on ICT scheme also matches elements of the new computing curriculum. Use of tablets, smartphones both within schools and at home, children have access to devices that enable them to see how these are used.

understand what algorithms are; how they are implemented as programs on digital devices; and that programs execute by following precise and unambiguous instructions, create and debug simple program, use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs: An Algorithm is a step by step procedure:

 



This is a brilliant video from Phil Bagge that explains this, his website is also a great site for a range of resources and useful links. Dance is also good for teaching algorithms. The other favourite of KS1 classrooms the Beebot is ideal for this strand of the new computing curriculum, there are also probots and also the old style roamers.  The obvious move onto this is then onto Scratch  this then brings in procedures. Snap byob  looks like Scratch but is not as visually appealing but this does work on iPads.  There is also the free Beebot app on the iPad as well as daisy the dinosaur.

use logical reasoning to predict the behaviour of simple programs: Games such as Angry birds enable children to use this.

In the next blog post we will look at KS2 and examples from the talk.

 

 

 

Tags

computing, Switched On Computing

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