Quick, Quack Quentin - Teaching (most of) the year 2 curriculum through one book!


Our guest blogger Maddy Barnes shows how you can use Quick, Quack Quentin by Kes Grey and Jim Field to teach (most of) the year 2 curriculum through one book! 

These are the following year 2 objectives (for reading, writing and grammar) that can be taught using Quick, Quack, Quentin. 

 




Reading
Pupils should be taught to:
  • develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:  listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of poetry (including contemporary and classic), stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently 

  • discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related 

  • discussing their favourite words and phrases 

  • checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading 

  • making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done 

  • answering and asking questions 

  • predicting what might happen on the basis of what 
has been read so far 
participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say
Writing (composition)
Pupils should be taught to:
  • develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by: writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional) 
and writing for different purposes
  • consider what they are going to write before beginning by: 
     - planning or saying out loud what they are going to 
write about 
     - writing down ideas and/or key words, including new vocabulary 
     - encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence  
     - proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar

Grammar
Formation of nouns using suffixes such as -ness, -er and by compounding (e.g. whiteboard, superman)

Formation of adjectives using suffixes such as -ful, -less 
(A fuller list of suffixes can be found in the year 2 spelling apendix.)

Use of the suffixes -er, -est in adjectives and -ly to turn adjectives into adverbs

Subordination (using when, if, that, because) and co-ordination (using or, and, but)

Expanded noun phrases for description and specification (eg. the blue butterfly, plain flour, the man in the moon)

How to grammatical patterns in a sentance indicate its function as a statement, question, exclamation or command

Correct choice and consistent use of present tense and past tense throughout writing

Use of the progressive form of verbs in the present and past tense to mark actions in progress (eg. she is drumming, he was shouting)

Use of capital letters, full stops, question marks and exclamation marks to demarcate sentances

Commas to seperate items in a list

Apostrophes to mark where letters are missing in spelling

Noun, noun phrase statement, question, exclamation, command, compound, adjective, verb, suffix
tense (past, present)
apostrophe, comma 



Overview of  the story: Quentin is a duck with a very quick quack. “QUCK!”  He needs an A and quickly. But finding a spare one isn’t easy. Without an A, FARMS become FRMS, SNAKES becomes SNKES and everything starts to feel a bit CRZY.



Objective        Activities

READING: checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading

Since the whole focus of this book is Quentin trying to find an A to fix his QUCK, teachers could encourage pupils to join in whilst reading the book and check whether Quentin has the correct letter. For example, HEN lends the E to become QUECK, PIG lends the I to become QUICK and Quentin takes OO from ZOO to become QUOOCK. Pupils will have great fun ‘editing’ these spellings and many more in the book.

COMPREHENSION: making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done; discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related; participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say 



There is a wide range of questions that teachers could focus on to assess pupils’ understanding of this text. 

Literal: What does the doctor say is wrong with Quentin?  Why can’t the doctor help Quentin? How many waddles is it to the farm?

Inference: Why does Quentin keep sighing in the book? Why does Aardvark say ‘don’t be greedy’ at the end of the book? Which animal was prepared to make the greatest sacrifice?

Vocabulary: ‘All the zoo animals with As were very sympathetic,’ what does ‘sympathetic’ mean? What does the doctor mean when he says ‘I’m afraid not’? 

Sequencing: Can you number the events 1-5 starting with the one that happened first.
  • Aardvark gives Quentin an A 
  • Quentin goes to see the doctor
  • Quentin goes to the zoo
  • Dog offers to give Quentin an O
  • Quentin is cured and has his QUACK back

ANALYSIS: discussing their favourite words and phrases

 

GRAMMAR: Verbs key terminology for year 2

Throughout the book, the authors use a variety of verbs when characters are speaking for example: qucked, sighed, asked, explained, woofed, replied, clucked, oinked, bellowed, cried, smiled, shouted, whooped and laughed.

Teachers could prepare these on cards and ask pupils to sort which animal used which verb – some will be very obvious (dog and woofed) and some will require pupils to return to the text to check.

Teachers could select some examples and ask pupils to rank them in the order they like best. Pupils could explain why they prefer one to another.

WRITE: develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by: writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and fictional) 
and writing for different purposes

This book could be the stimulus for a number of writing opportunities for pupils to complete:

  • Quentin’s diary: Quentin could write a diary entry at different points in the book. The first could begin with QUECK DIARY, another could be QUOCK DIARY, QUICK DIARY etc until the final entry is QUACK DIARY. Teachers could focus on recount skills and expanded noun phrases in this diary entry for example, generous pink pig offered his I and kind, caring dog offered his O.
  • Letter to the aardvark: Pupils could write in role as Quentin thanking aardvark for his A. Teachers could teach the full range of sentences – statements: I needed to find an A. Commands: Please accept this letter of thanks. Questions:Can you believe I didn’t give up? Exclamations: How lucky I was to find you! and challenge pupils to use all 4 in their writing.
  • Alternative story: Pupils could create their own version of this story. Teachers could provide some ideas – OINK, ONK OSCAR or NEIGH, NEIH NORRIS. Pupils would need to plan their stories using a planning sheet they are familiar with. Pupils may benefit from some drama activities before writing their own version.

PLANNING: planning or saying out loud what they are going to 
write about; writing down ideas and/or key words, including new vocabulary; encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence

Year 2 pupils should be taught how to use both coordinating and subordinating conjunctions. Depending on pupils’ ability, teachers could review learning and ask pupils to write a sentence using ‘but’ and a sentence using ‘because’ about Quentin. Or if this is new learning, teachers could teach ‘but’ one day and then teach ‘because’ another day. Teachers could provide an example of each - Quentin needed an A but he couldn’t find one. Quentin went to the zoo because he wanted to find an animal with an A. When teaching subordination, it is a good idea to write the sentence with because at the beginning of the sentence too, ‘Because he wanted to find an animal with an A, Quentin went to the zoo'. As pupils create their own sentences, teachers can model the process of oral rehearsal - planning what we are going to say and checking that we have written it accurately.

EDITING: proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar

Teachers could use this book as an example of how we edit our own writing and share these thoughts with pupils. Whilst reading the book, we can identify the mistakes easily. What strategies can we use when editing our own writing? Can we check if there are any missing words? If there are, we must put them in. Is all of our punctuation correct? Have we checked each sentence has a capital letter and some punctuation at the end? If we haven’t, we must put it in. Have we used a range of sentences? Could we use an exclamation or a question in this writing?


You can order your copy of Quick, Quack Quentin here

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